Seeing Isn’t Believing

Eyes of Maitreya Buddha - third eye

 

People are divided into two groups:  those who must see it to believe it, and those who believe it before they see it and create it.  (Reread that!)

All the amazing inventions in history came from the “great invisible” through someone’s belief in an invisible idea.  Since we’re all not inventors on the grand scale, we can still live creatively by taking that principle and holding it as motivation.

This could be the vision of relationships, of a professional life, of daily life as a canvas upon which to paint a novel and mindful creation.

What interferes with this?  The “obvious” intrudes upon creativity.  There are material limitations that come through our senses and impair our ability to be creative.  Negative thinking, poor self-esteem, discouraging people, and setbacks are all culprits that get in the way of living with an open heart.  Living creatively means overcoming those obstacles with faith.

If those previously discouraging elements can be cues to look further within and overcome fear with grace and faith. Instead of waiting to see proof with our senses, curiosity and inner activity will provide our motivation.

The act of creativity isn’t reserved for artists, musicians and inventors.  The “third eye,” situated in the middle of the forehead in middle eastern faiths, represents wisdom beyond the senses.  We could also describe that as not needing to see it to believe it.

With love, Rosanne Bostonian

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Desire and the Chase

Relaxing on the porchDoesn’t it seem that the more we chase the things we want in Life, the more elusive they seem to be?

In Buddhist lore, desire and greed are interchangeable concepts, both being seen as “poisons.” The notion of chasing something we desire is the equivalent of ingratitude for what “is,” and can hook us into an insatiable quest for more, more and (yes) more.

Our culture worships those who make it big financially and materially.  As we see with various famous and powerful people in our country, those who have accumulated material abundance believe themselves to also possess virtue and wisdom.  This is often far from reality.  The endless chase for more makes us vulnerable to the addictions created by desire and greed.

I guess “sufficiency,” or having enough, doesn’t fuel capitalism.  But insufficiency and a sense of inadequacy, definitely create stress, anxiety, depression and a host of other maladies that allow the pharmaceutical industry to thrive.

The one impoverishment that may help us all is less and less desire and slowing down the chase!

With love, Rosanne Bostonian

Let Your Heart Break

Broken HeartWhat a curious title, considering that we humans use so much energy trying to avoid heartbreak and its miseries.   Why should accepting heartbreak be a goal?

When the heart breaks it’s a sign that we were open, we tried, we were fully present.  When the heart breaks we rolled the dice and bet on Love.  And when the heart breaks the Jury of Angels celebrates our faith, even though the desired outcome wasn’t reached.

There’s a saying, “The heart breaks to open wider.”  I’ll try to explain:

We have a choice to bet on Love or live from fear.  To choose love, especially after heartbreak, it celebrates the courage to remain open, regardless of our pain.  To love again we’ve affirmed Love as our source of energy, and we’ve conquered fear.

How did I do?

If we think that we can avoid pain and still remain open enough to love, we’re sadly mistaken.  Openness includes ALL emotions.  There’s no filter that only lets the happy moments in and keeps the sad ones out.  All addiction is based on the distortion that we can pick and choose what we experience, only letting pleasantries in.

I’m interested in what you think about this.  I’m listening!

With THAT love, Rosanne Bostonian

“Despair = Suffering – Meaning”

Man's Search for Meaning

In his book “Man’s Search for Meaning,” Viktor Frankl documented his concentration camp incarceration during World War I.  As a psychiatrist, he gave meaning to his terrible experience by observing his fellow inmates closely.

What he discovered was those who made the conscious choice to give their lives meaning, survived at higher rates despite horrific conditions.  Those for whom each day had no meaning slipped into despair and gave up.

In the typical life, those with vibrant and energetic pursuits thrive while those who become passive observers don’t do as well.  We can see an illustration of this principle in retirees who envision a carefree life, but they find the lack of meaning taking its toll on their motivation and overall health.

The recent Parkland tragedy is another illustration.  Students and parents in that community have given the otherwise meaningless slaughter a purpose by taking on a variety of causes.  They made a choice.

The losses and tribulations of human life can either cause despair, or we can choose the antidote, “meaning.”  If we choose to invest our lives with purpose, we can thrive in painful circumstances.

Viktor Frankl stated that the last thing we relinquish is our freedom to choose a life with meaning.  It’s the one element no one can take regardless of circumstances.

I’m going to sit down and think of what gives my life meaning.  Sharing a few ideas through these blogs is definitely on the list.

With love, Rosanne Bostonian

Be-Longing

Diversity and belonging

When I was 5 year-old I was marched off to kindergarten.  I had no idea what was going on, but I had motivation to be able to read.  When the Sunday papers arrived, I could see the bright colored comics, but had no clue what was in “the balloons.”  Kindergarten was going to be my salvation.

On the first day of kindergarten, there I was among many children my age.  I was amazed that there were that many in the world, so I guess I wasn’t listening to the teacher.  One little guy in overalls was racing for the door and dutifully marched back to his seat.  In retrospect, I should have joined him on his hot retreat.

I was different. I wasn’t listening.  This apparently was cause to send me to the coat room.  Over time I knew every figure on the coat room walls; Humpty Dumpty, Little Bow Peep (What kind of a name is Bow Peep? I guess she didn’t belong either) and a variety of others amidst an array of little coats. I can’t tell you what sins I committed to be relegated to that dark space!

In antiquity “belonging” meant surviving. There’s a part of our brains that wants to hide in a crowd, circle the wagons and have someone care enough about us to fight the good fight on our behalf.  There is no part of a 5 year-old that feels good in a coat room. To that I can attest.

The Coat Room Saga was exclusionary and made me feel different. I thought different was analogous “unacceptable,” so I compensated with high achievement.  I guess that’s better than drugs and antisocial behavior, but the root causes of extreme manifestations are the same.  Not feeling welcome in the world.

This is what I now know:  Those of us who are different are part of a mosaic of many colors.  Blue shouldn’t try to be red, but should find a beautiful place in the sky.  There is room for everyone in God’s world, but sometimes not in man’s world.  Driven out of man’s world, we can become the Child of God.  To accomplish that shift, we’ve got to see that belonging isn’t the same as to be-longing.

To be-longing is to reach for our highest and best, out-picturing our uniqueness to expand the human mosaic.  From the roof-tops (and from the Coat Room of the Past), I proclaim that we are ok, that we are welcome and that our longing will only be answered with our own authentic voices.

With love,

Rosanne

Random Encounters

city streets with snow and rain

 

Ever since the “Ear Bud Incident,” I’ve been more conscious of other people, their expressions and moments that can be shared randomly.  My momma didn’t raise a child that was incapable of learning from experience!

Today the weather was ridiculous, first snow then rain.  Shoveling that stuff was a back breaker, followed by my workout at the gym.  I was feeling really heroic leaving the gym, when a bus drove by and slammed me with a tsunami of street water.  If the ground wasn’t wet, I’d have sat down and cried.  But maybe I could have just had a good laugh!

From there it was to CVS to pick up a prescription.  My sweaty and soggy self was on line when I noticed that we were standing next to the condom aisle.  The woman ahead of me was starting to huff and puff because the service was slow, so I said, “Well, at least we can shop for condoms while we’re waiting.”  She cracked up and we both had a good laugh.

This was followed by the spring-loaded umbrella of the man behind me opening up on my derriere.  I turned around (yes, we were still in the condom aisle) and he was apologizing profusely when I said, “That thing is a lethal weapon!”  More laughter.

When I left the store, I passed a woman who was sloshing along looking miserable, and I said “Isn’t this delightful?”  To which she responded, laughing, “I’m enjoying every minute of it!”

The point is that we’re human and we share so much, yet we isolate ourselves based on distraction and unfamiliarity.  I’ll probably never see those people again, but maybe there is a little legacy, a footprint, left of one light hearted moment in time.  And maybe that’s enough.

With love,  Rosanne Bostonian