Ancient Oils

oils of the ancient scripture

The origins of myrrh and frankincense are traced to the Arabian Peninsula.

According to Herodotus (5th century BC): “Arabia is the only country which produces frankincense, myrrh, cassia and cinnamon…the trees bearing the frankincense are guarded by winged serpents of small size and various colors.”

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Myrrh is a resin, or sap-like substance, that comes from a tree called Commiphora myrrha, common in Africa or the Middle East. Myrrh is botanically related to Frankincense, and is one of the most widely used essential oils in the world. The myrrh tree is distinctive due to its white flowers and knotted trunk.

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Sandalwood oil is extracted from the woods for use. Sandalwood is the second most expensive wood in the world, right after African Blackwood. Both the wood and the oil produce a distinctive fragrance that has been highly valued for centuries.

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Onycha, spoken of in Exodus 30:34, was one of the ingredients of the sacred perfume. It consists of the shells of several kinds of mussels, which when burned emit a strong odor.

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Jasmine

Jasmine Essential Oil

Jasmine belongs to the Genus ‘Jasminum’ and includes over 200 species of plants, most of which originated in tropical and sub-tropical areas.

Its name comes from the Persian word ‘yasmin’ meaning gift from God.

Jasmine aroma

Flowering in Jasmines takes place in summer or spring which is usually six months after planting. The Jasmine flower releases its fragrance at night after the sun has set and especially when the moon is waxing towards fullness. Jasmine flower buds are more fragrant than the flowers.

Jasmine Essential Oil

 

Jasmine originated in the tropical regions of Asia but is now grown worldwide. While tropical Jasmine will not survive in temperate regions, some modern varieties do.

Cultivated versions are also sold as houseplants. Many gardeners add jasmine to flower gardens or grow them in pots on the deck or patio to scent the night air.

Jasmine Essential Oil

Jasmine is used as a fragrance in perfumes, soaps, and lotions and is even used to add its rich scent to jasmine tea. Jasmine tea isn’t really made from jasmine. The tea is brewed from green tea, and then infused with the fragrance of jasmine.

Jasmine is believed to be both an antidepressant and an aphrodisiac making it a popular scent in the bedroom. Jasmine is also thought to be a sedative and sleep aid.

Energy

Love is The Energy of Life sign with a beach

There are two kinds of energy, potential and manifest.  Before you think this is going to be boring, bear with me!

Potential energy is waiting to be expressed.  If it waits too long it stagnates and if it stagnates in our bodies it creates dis-ease.  (That’s not a typo!)

When energy is freed to move, it is manifested.  It can be manifested through intentions, meaning “If I have an idea and I put it into motion, I’m freeing up energy.”

Money is energy in material form.  It waits to be freed to create opportunities, experiences and sustenance.  Saving is great, but dying with stagnated energy in the bank probably isn’t the best idea.  Bequeathing the fruits of labor for the next generation to use isn’t a bad plan, but using money to do good works is a great idea.

Physical movement frees energy.  Our jobs keep us seated a lot of the time.  Stagnated sitting creates pain in the low back and digestive issues.  Take it from me after years of sitting in the therapist’s chair!

What I experience in Reiki and Reflexology practice is the movement of energy in clients who rise from the table feeling cleared and rebooted.  Therapeutic essential oils do the same clearing.  Even moderate movement frees up energy.

Love is the purest energy and can be expressed interpersonally, in work and in everything we do.  If expressing love is the intention, the actions that come from it will bring positive change.

Move your booty!  Don’t ruminate in your head! Have the intentions of embodying love energy and freeing potential energy every chance you get.   You will bring light into your world…

With love, Rosanne

Chinese Wolfberries

wolfberries

The Chinese Wolfberry is one of the most antioxidant-rich fruits around.

Chinese Wolfberries are said to contain more beta-carotene, a type of antioxidant, than carrots. Antioxidants may have anti-aging and cancer-fighting effects.

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Chinese Wolfberries can be cooked, turned into wine or eaten raw.

In Chinese cuisine and medicine, the berries are used in numerous dishes such as porridge, meat and vegetable dishes, soups and teas. In the West, they are often eaten in their dried, uncooked form.

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Essential Oils to Use for a Cold

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Essential Oils
Image: youngliving.com

A certified reiki master teacher, Rosanne (Roseanne) Bostonian, PhD, is committed to fostering health and well-being in her clients. In addition to her energy work, Dr. Rosanne Bostonian is an independent wholesaler of Young Living Essential Oils, and she helps educate people about the properties of essential oils can impact their health.

Some essential oils can help alleviate the head cold symptoms, such as fever, headache, and stuffy nose. Tea tree essential oil, for instance, is said to attack congestion and help open up air passages. It’s best to dissolve this oil in a hot bath or breathe it in with an inhaler. Thyme oil can also be mixed with tea tree oil for enhanced benefits.

Peppermint essential oil is said to fight against viruses and help alleviate chest coughs. The preferred vehicle for this oil is also through an inhaler. It is always best to consult with someone who is knowledgeable of essential oils, particularly if you are new to using them.

Disclaimer: The FDA has not evaluated the curative properties of essential oils.